Internet Explorer 8 and lower are no longer supported on the UxC Website. Visit here for more information.
Internet Explorer versions 9 and 10 will soon no longer be supported. Visit here for more information.
USA

World Nuclear Association Symposium

China’s Role in the Nuclear Fuel Market

Ux Consulting (UxC), the nuclear fuel industry’s leading market consultancy, has devoted this year to researching and analyzing China’s current and future role in the nuclear fuel market. The result of this effort culminated into three in-depth essays focused on China’s uranium, conversion, and enrichment supply and demand situations, and an update to UxC’s major China Geopolitics report, which examines China’s entire nuclear energy program in detail. These essays, which were originally published in our related Market Outlook reports, are now available separately or packaged together.

China’s Uranium Supply: Feeding a Hungry Tiger

Originally published in UxC’s Uranium Market Outlook (UMO) 2010-Q4 edition.

China Reactor Forecast

No amount of hyperbole can describe the impact that China has already had and will continue to have in the coming decades on nearly every aspect of the global nuclear marketplace. As for the global uranium market, China’s impact is already being felt tremendously, and, if the latest increases in uranium prices are any indication, China’s rapid nuclear reactor buildup and the consequent large growth in uranium (U3O8) demand are one of the key focal points in the nuclear fuel industry today. Many market observers have been openly wondering how China will satisfy its massive future uranium needs, especially in light of the fact that China is not blessed with large, economically recoverable domestic uranium reserves. This essay comprehensively reviews all the available information on China’s uranium supply and demand to provide detailed and accurate analysis and forecasts through 2030. It also examines the impact that China’s aggressive pursuit of uranium is having on the broader market.

Please see the uranium essay table of contents in Adobe Acrobat PDF format

China’s Conversion Industry: How Will They Get UF6?

Originally published in UxC’s Conversion Market Outlook (CMO) 2010-11 edition.

China Reactor Demand

Although China has already made significant efforts in securing natural uranium from the world marketplace, it remains unclear how all this imported as well as domestically produced U3O8 will be converted to UF6 in order to allow for domestic enrichment. This essay examines China’s uranium conversion industry as it exists today and how the necessary additional capacity may be acquired in order to feed the country’s rapidly growing reactor fleet’s fuel requirements. The essay also examines the impact of increased conversion capacity in China on the broader global conversion supply and demand balance.

Please see the conversion essay table of contents in Adobe Acrobat PDF format

China’s Enrichment Program: A Growing Giant

Originally published in UxC’s Enrichment Market Outlook (EMO) 2010-Q3 edition.

China Reactor Forecast

While much attention has already been placed on China’s impact on the uranium market, one aspect of the fuel cycle that continues to see many questions raised is the current status and future prospects of China’s uranium enrichment supply. Indeed, in view of China’s aggressive plans for NPP deployment, one wonders how all the necessary SWU capacity for nuclear fuel supply will be provided. This essay analyzes all elements of the enrichment industry in China, including past production capabilities along with likely future enrichment facility expansions. A complete analysis of SWU supply and demand along with market activities and related developments are reviewed in order to better understand the likelihood that China will be able to deliver SWU to its domestic reactor fleet, and also to potentially supply foreign utility customers.

Please see the enrichment essay table of contents in Adobe Acrobat PDF format

The Changing Geopolitics of the Nuclear Energy Market – China

China Report

In September 2009, UxC issued a major report on China’s entire nuclear energy program. An update to this report was published in June 2010. At 150+ pages, the initial report provides a comprehensive overview of China’s current and prospective nuclear power program and industry, and the role of nuclear in China’s total energy supply. The report identifies all major details of China’s reactor program, including current reactors, those under construction, and plans for new units. UxC presents its proprietary forecasts for high, base, and low case nuclear power growth scenarios through 2030, examining the potential outcomes for China’s future. As part of our Geopolitical Series that also includes reports on Russia and India, this China report aims to separate the hype from reality and get down to answering serious questions, including:

  • How much nuclear capacity will be built and when will they build?
  • What technologies will they choose?
  • Which companies will be involved?
  • What are the factors helping and/or hindering in their development?
  • Where will they get the fuel to power their reactors?
  • What impact will their growth in nuclear power have on other countries in the region or the world?

Please see the September 2009 and June 2010 table of contents in PDF format.

Pricing Information

Since these three new essays plus the larger Geopolitics report are all complementary, we highly recommend that they be purchased together. Therefore, although individual reports are available, package pricing does reflect discounts. Pricing details for report packages and individual reports are as follows:

Individual Essays/Report:
UMO Essay – China’s Uranium Supply: US$2,000.00
CMO Essay – China’s Conversion Industry: US$1,500.00
EMO Essay – China’s Enrichment Program: US$1,500.00
China Geopolitics (September 2009 report + June 2010 update): US$3,500.00

Package Deals:
All Three Essays: US$4,000.00
3 Essays + Geopolitics Report: US$6,500.00

For additional information, please contact:
Eric Webb  +1 (770) 642-7745  
Jonathan Hinze  +1 (603) 425-1185